North Kingstown Free Library Teens

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Reblogged from algonquinbooks

(Source: algonquinbooks, via powells)

Reblogged from askmaridee
gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

(via teachingliteracy)

Reblogged from my-ultra-bookheaven

Reblogged from penguinteen
penguinteen:

A quote so nice, we’re posting it twice. Enjoy the full interview with John Green here. 

penguinteen:

A quote so nice, we’re posting it twice. Enjoy the full interview with John Green here

(via lauriehalseanderson)

Reblogged from jvh1988

Tom Felton: A Tour of Diagon Alley

(Source: jvh1988, via yahighway)

Reblogged from thankyouharrypo
thankyouharrypo:

she said that.

thankyouharrypo:

she said that.

(Source: weheartit.com, via the-library-lady)

Reblogged from olplya
Reblogged from seabois
Inside us there is a word we cannot pronounce and that is who we are. Anthony Marra (via seabois)

(via yahighway)

Reblogged from mostlysignssomeportents

The Shadow Hero: giving an origin story to comics’ first Asian-American superhero

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Gene Luen Yang has made comics history with his graphic novels about race and identity, now, with Sonny Liew, he goes back in time to reinvent the first Asian superhero in the history of comics. Cory Doctorow reviews The Shadow Hero and presents an exclusive excerpt.

Read more…

(Please reblog this!)

image

(via asianbranchteenlib)

Reblogged from readinglunch
rainbowrowell:

readinglunch:

Bombshells from rainbowrowell this morning on Twitter. I’m all a-twitter! And I hate that I used that pun but it felt right.
-A

LANDLINE EASTER EGG.

rainbowrowell:

readinglunch:

Bombshells from rainbowrowell this morning on Twitter. I’m all a-twitter! And I hate that I used that pun but it felt right.

-A

LANDLINE EASTER EGG.